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The terms macroevolution and microevolution were first used by evolutionary Russian entomologist Iurii Filipchenko in a 1927 book titled Variabilitat und Variation. He asserted that micro- and macroevolution were processes involving different mechanisms and caliber. The terms were later introduced to English-speaking biological community in 1937 by Filipchenko's former student Theodosius Dobzhansky in Genetics and the Origin of Species.
In the late 1930s, Dobzhansky helped devise the modern evolutionary synthesis, a neodarwinian view that attempted to reconcile Darwinism with mendelian genetics.[5] The modern synthesis accepted as one of its basic tenets the proposal that all evolution was best explained by a simple extrapolation from micro to macro-evolution. It was asserted that there is no fundamental distinction made between micro and macroevolution[6] 
Info Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Macroevolution
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Image Source:Image Source: (Fair Use)
Miller and Levine, Prentice Hall Biology, 2008, p834.
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The terms macroevolution and microevolution were first used by evolutionary Russian entomologist Iurii Filipchenko in a 1927 book titled Variabilitat und Variation. He asserted that micro- and macroevolution were processes involving different mechanisms and caliber. The terms were later introduced to English-speaking biological community in 1937 by Filipchenko's former student Theodosius Dobzhansky in Genetics and the Origin of Species.
In the late 1930s, Dobzhansky helped devise the modern evolutionary synthesis, a neodarwinian view that attempted to reconcile Darwinism with mendelian genetics.[5] The modern synthesis accepted as one of its basic tenets the proposal that all evolution was best explained by a simple extrapolation from micro to macro-evolution. It was asserted that there is no fundamental distinction made between micro and macroevolution[6] 
Info Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Macroevolution
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Image Source: (Fair Use)
Miller and Levine, Prentice Hall Biology, 2008, p835.
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All these deal with being bipedal:
FINE BALANCE: Requires a fine sense of balance. The inner ear has a network of fluid-filled canals which contain sensors which are sensitive to movement and gravity. The sensors consist of fine hairs which send out signals to indicate direction and speed. Humans have a more complex inner ear design than apes
FLAT FACE: So their eyes have a field of view which extends down to the ground in front of the feet.
UPRIGHT SKULL: the position at which the spinal cord enters the skull. In humans it is located at the bottom of the skull. This means the most natural position  for the head is looking forward in the upright position.
STRAIGHT BACK: This is ideal for upright posture because the torso and head are directly above the hips in the standing position. Apes have a curved back.
FULLY EXTENDABLE FEMUR BONES: When looking from the front humans have femur bones which are angled inwards as they come down from the hip. This has the effect of making the knees and feet closer together. Having feet closer together keeps the feet nearly under the center of the body and gives stability during walking and running. During walking and running the body is supported by one leg at any instant and so the body can topple over if the legs are not right under the body. If the feet were not close together then the body would be thrown from side to side
FULLY EXTENDABLE KNEE JOINTS:
VERY LONG LEGS: The length of human legs is about half the total body. This makes it possible to walk and run for long distances with relative ease. In contrast, apes are only about a third.
ARCHED FEET: The human foot is arched between the ball of the foot and the toes. The foot has around 26 bones and many muscles and ligaments, tendons and nerves so the foot can flex between the heel and the ball. The arched structure of the foot makes it easy for a person to press down on the ball for the foot which is important for balance and control. This ability is also important for movements such as standing on tiptoe, running and turning. It also helps absorb shocks during walking and running. In contrast the feet and hands of apes are like hands suited for grasping.
STRONG BIG TOES: This feature is important for walking and running. For each step, the final push from the ground comes from the big toe. In order to propel the body forwards in a controlled manner, the big toe must be very strong. Apes have a toe designed for grasping. They cannot make a firm push from their big toe.
Image Source: (Fair Use)
Miller and Levine, Prentice Hall Biology, 2008, p835.
Examination of LeMoustier (a teenage Neanderthal) by orthodonist Jack Cuozzo revealed that the jaw had been positioned outside of its socket (TM Fossa) to make the skull look more ape-like.
Buried Alive by Dr. Jack Cuozzo, p166-167
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Image Source
http://creationwiki.org/Neanderthal
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Although the feet, hands, and most of the skull are missing, the vast majority of the other bones have been found since this initial find, giving us an accurate picture of what A. afarensis looked like.
Named Lucy because the Beetles song “Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds” was playing on the tape player when it was found.
Actually only 20% of the bones were found, but 40% is claimed because they aren't counting the missing foot bones.
Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/lucy
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Statue at Living World exhibit, St. Louis Zoo. Shown with human-like trunk, breasts, genitalia, arms, hands, legs, feet, posture, gait, and pensive gaze.
Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/lucy
Picture of Lucy from: Biology: Understanding Life Third Edition, 2000
The curvature of the fingers and toes of A. Afarensis were compared to other apes and humans in the following publication.
J. Stern, R. Sussman, 1983. Am J. Phys. Anthropology, 60:279-312.
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Source:
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/359/title/Lucy_on_the_ground_with_knuckles
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Iliac blades of human go front to back – whereas in the apes the iliac blades flare out laterally.  The orientation of the iliac blade is important for maintaining posture while walking upright.
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C. Owen Lovejoy is Chairman of Anthropology at Kent State University
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C. Owen Lovejoy is Chairman of Anthropology at Kent State University
PBS Nova Series; In Search of Human Origins
episode one 1994 (Dr. Owen Lovejoy)
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Skull of Lucy is not that of a human – with the sloping face typical of Apes (shovel face). Canines also come in at an angle unlike humans which come in more straight down. Cranial capacity is even smaller than a typical ape. Doesn’t have nasal bones that humans possess.
Teeth are relatively small for apes and have thick enamel – making them seem more human-like.
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Jaw of Lucy is much more similar to Chimp than Humans.
The point of attachment of the spine, which in humans is close to the center allowing upright posture, is even further back on the skull than in Chimps.
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Lucy had a large exterior ear-hole like the apes. Also the same semi-circular canal for balance control as apes – typical of knuckle walkers.
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National Geographic reconstruction. Whites in their eyes are a human characteristic (no apes have whites).
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Information source: Mike Riddle and Thomas Kindell
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Charles Oxnard - Arguably the worlds foremost expert on computerized analysis of bones using digitized x-rays and 3-d rendering. Former professor of Anatomy and Anthropology of the University of Chicago, and currently the University of Western Australia.
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Found in western Nebraska in 1922 – first supposed transitional hominid found in the western hemisphere – was used in textbooks, colleges and presented as evidence in the Scopes Monkey Trial.
Info and Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Nebraska_Man
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Info and Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Nebraska_Man
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The tooth genus of Peccary called Prosthennops and its identification as an ape was retracted in the journal Science in 1927.
Info and Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Nebraska_Man
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Info Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Nebraska_Man
The tooth genus of Peccary called Prosthennops and its identification as an ape was retracted in the journal Science in 1927.
Image Source:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Collared_Peccary.jpg
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Excavating the Piltdown gravels in 1911, with Dawson (right) and Smith Woodward (center).
Piltdown man was said to be found by an amateur fossil hunter named Charles Dawson. He claimed to have found pieces of a human skull from a gravel pit in Piltdown, England. He also claimed that he found ape-like lower jaw with human-like teeth after additional digging. The two claimed finds were assigned to the same person who was said to be at least 500,000 years old.
Image and Info Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Piltdown_Man
Info Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Piltdown_Man
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Piltdown Man is now recognized as one of the most spectacular and longest enduring frauds in the history of modern science.
In 1953 scientists subjected the find to chemical analysis which proved the ape-like jawbone was of recent origin. Close inspection also revealed file marks on the teeth, which had been shortened to make them appear human-like. In addition, the bones had been treated with chemicals to increase the appearance of their age. It was quickly concluded that the jaw had been intentionally planted, and bore no resemblance to the human skull, which was later determined to be from the Middle Ages. Later in 1982, collagen testing proved conclusively that the jawbone was from an Orangutan.
Info Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Piltdown_Man
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Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Human
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Psalm 8:4-9
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http://hubpages.com/hub/AMAZING_HUMAN_FACTS
Scientists have counted over 500 liver functions. The liver is often called the body's chemical factory.
Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Biological_system
Humans are composed of an estimated 100 trillion cells and generate somewhere near 1 millions new cells per second.
Info Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Cell_biology
Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/Stem_cell
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When studying the human body, we are confronted with a designer behind the seamlessly interwoven design that underlies the DNA molecular, cell-to-cell communication, or the interconnectedness of the various body systems. DNA itself is a thread-like molecule – each human cell has approximately No cell or system in the body works independently of others. They are knit together are the psalmist accurately describes.
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Laminin is a cell binding protein.
laminin is a protein found in the "extracellular matrix", the sheets of protein that form the substrate of all internal organs also called the "basement membrane". It has four arms that can bind to four other molecules. The three shorter arms are particularly good at binding to other laminin molecules, which is what makes it so great at forming sheets. The long arm is capable of binding to cells, which helps anchor the actual organs to the membrane.
They are a family of glycoproteins that are an integral part of the structural scaffolding in almost every animal tissue. Laminins are secreted and incorporated into cell-associated extracellular matrices.
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Genesis 1:27 So God created man in his own image,
       in the image of God he created him;
       male and female he created them.
Ephesians 2:10 For we are God's workmanship, created in Christ Jesus to do good works, which God prepared in advance for us to do.
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Image Source:
http://creationwiki.org/DNA
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Image from http://dgl.microsoft.com/  (microsoft online clipart)
Dobzhansky – 1973 “Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.
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If you differ by more than 22 substitutions you fall outside the human range according to evolutionists
Knee has high carrying angle. They were knock-knee’d like humans.
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Modern primates also have a carrying angle similar to humans – therefore, the carrying angle of the A. afarensis does not prove they were evolving into humans.
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